Author - Stephen Farah

Confession: secundus

As explained in my last post The Psychological Practice of Confession I have committed to an annual public confession. My first such confession was made at the end of last year (2018)[1]. This is my second annual confession. I won’t restate the reasoning behind these confessions here, which would be redundant given my prior post. However, there are a few issues I want to emphasise prior to the confession. This is done both for the purposes of providing an example of confession to students commencing on [...]

The psychological practice of confession

This post deals with the topic of confession, its psychological and spiritual value, how to understand the idea and purpose of confession in the psychotherapeutic context and the importance of collective or objective context in the act of the confession. In addition to offering some background and theory on the act of confession, I will offer you some ways of thinking about why you might consider adopting it as a personal practice and a structure within which you can [...]

Prozac and the royal road to misery

modern (wo)man in search of soul in the wasteland of meaning Epigraph: In 2006 I had occasion to spend Diwali in Mauritius with my then sister-in-law, Joanne Farah. One of the celebrants at the hotel where we were staying was offering Henna tattoos to the guests. I asked for the word ‘spirit’ to be tattooed on my arm. When my sister-in-law, seemingly bemused, inquired as to what exactly I considered ‘spirit’ to be, I was unable or possibly unwilling to [...]

Michael

Michael Eblen Farah my brother, died on the 4th of June this year, 2019.[1] Whilst a shock, his death was not entirely unexpected. He had a high risk of mortality at the time of his death and in the two or three years preceding it. He battled his entire adult life with depression and generalised anxiety disorder; and, few years ago, was also diagnosed with adult ADHD, which was certainly consistent with his behaviour and lifestyle. These issues, whilst [...]

Projection: how you create your world

Projection is one of the classic psychological defence mechanisms described by Sigmund Freud in psychoanalysis.[1] According to Freud, a defence mechanism, such as projection, is used for two primary reasons. Firstly, to defend anxiety. The subject at risk of experiencing overwhelming anxiety uses a psychological defence mechanism to establish an internal (intrapsychic) firewall that prevents her conscious ego being flooded by the anxiety inducing content. The second is to maintain the subject’s self-schema or sense of identity. Anything that [...]

Problems, dilemmas, predicaments: a Jungian approach

As long as one is alive, sane and living in the world you can be sure of having to face and negotiate problems. Much like death and taxes, problems come with the territory. To quote the Bard, To be, or not to be, that is the question: Whether ’tis nobler in the mind to suffer The slings and arrows of outrageous fortune, Or to take Arms against a Sea of troubles, And by opposing end them: to die, to sleep No more; and by a [...]

Archetypes and the Collective Unconscious: by C. G. Jung

A Synopsis  by Shane Eynon, PhD (Centre for Applied Jungian Studies and the Philadelphia Association of Jungian Analysts) Archetypes and the Collective Unconscious is Part 1 of Volume 9 in The Collected Works of C. G. Jung, a series of books published by Princeton University Press in the U.S. and Routledge & Kegan Paul in the U.K. Three essays establish Jung’s theory. They are followed by essays on specific archetypes and a section relating them to the process of individuation. The volume [...]

Lobster vs. toilet guy

Jordan Peterson – Slavoj Žižek debate 19th of April 2019 Sony Centre in Toronto, Ontario, Canada   Authors note My notes are shorthand for the actual debate and fail to capture the rhetorical devices employed by the interlocutors. I paraphrase throughout and all direct quotes are in quotation marks. My apologies for grammatical errors, I wanted to get these notes out whilst there is still interest in the debate. Consequently, after spending several hours listening to the debate and writing up the [...]

Confession

Secrets or inhibited emotions, analogous to repressed sins that lead to neuroses, must be confessed to enable the patient to regain his wholeness.[1] As you stand on the threshold of a new year[2] there exists, at least symbolically, the opportunity for renewal. A renewal of desires and ideals. An opportunity, modest as it may be, to reimagine yourself. To put this in the Jungian lexicon, an opportunity for soul retrieval. A fancy way of saying, a chance to recapture a [...]

The Essential James Hillman; A Blue Fire

Paperback:336 pages Publisher: Harper Perennial (June 19, 1997) Language:English ISBN-10:0060921013 ISBN-13: 978-006092101 Book review and synopsis written by Shane Eynon PhD James Hillman (April 12, 1926 – October 27, 2011) was an American psychologist. He studied at, and then became the leader of studies for, the C.G. Jung Institute in Zurich soon after the death of C.G. Jung. Hillman was born in Atlantic City, New Jersey in 1926. He was the third child of four born to Madeleine and Julian Hillman. James was born in Breakers Hotel, one [...]