Art of Individuation

REGISTRATION NOW OPEN

Registration closes Thursday 6 October 2022 (midnight PST)

REGISTRATION NOW OPEN

Registration closes Thursday 6 October 2022 (midnight PST)

Lecture Series

Lecture Series

Art of Individuation.
by Stephen Anthony Farah, MA

Federico García Lorca’s Theory of Duende: The Chthonic, the Bodily, and the Principle of Struggle in the Process of (Self-)Creation.
by Dr. Federico Bonaddio

Lorca’s Drawings: Art, Self, and the Unconscious. (supplementary lecture)
by Dr. Federico Bonaddio

The Struggle of the Mutinous Human Spirit’: The Daimon Archetype in the Paintings of Mikhail Vrubel.
by Cyril Coetzee

Individuation, performativity, and the Anthropocene. (workshop).
by Nobonke (Tossie van Tonder)

Lorca, duende, and art.
by Dr. Giannina Braschi

Marsilio Ficino: composing the present moment.
by Thomas Moore

Art of Individuation workshop and discussion.
by AOI core faculty

Goethe on das dӓmonische in life and art.
by Prof. Paul Bishop

Art of Individuation.
by Stephen Anthony Farah, MA

Federico García Lorca’s Theory of Duende: The Chthonic, the Bodily, and the Principle of Struggle in the Process of (Self-)Creation.
by Dr. Federico Bonaddio

Lorca’s Drawings: Art, Self, and the Unconscious. (supplementary lecture)
by Dr. Federico Bonaddio

The Struggle of the Mutinous Human Spirit’: The Daimon Archetype in the Paintings of Mikhail Vrubel.
by Cyril Coetzee

Individuation, performativity, and the Anthropocene. (workshop).
by Nobonke (Tossie van Tonder)

Lorca, duende, and art.
by Dr. Giannina Braschi

Marsilio Ficino: composing the present moment.
by Thomas Moore

Art of Individuation workshop and discussion.
by AOI core faculty

Goethe on das dӓmonische in life and art.
by Prof. Paul Bishop

For every man, every artist called Nietzsche or Cezanne, every step that he climbs in the tower of his perfection is at the expense of the struggle that he undergoes with his duende, not with an angel, as is often said, nor with his Muse. This is a precise and fundamental distinction at the root of their work.

-Frederico Garcia Lorca

The Art of Individuation Application

The Art of Individuation Application

A guided process for the eight-weeks of the programme, giving expression to your daemon through the artistic process. The expression can be done in any artistic form you choose, visual, dramatic, movement, musical or written. This will culminate with your artwork being shared with the student and facilitation group on the student forum. All graduates’ artworks will be curated and displayed in a virtual gallery on the Applied Jung website.

A guided process for the eight-weeks of the programme, giving expression to your daemon through the artistic process. The expression can be done in any artistic form you choose, visual, dramatic, movement, musical or written. This will culminate with your artwork being shared with the student and facilitation group on the student forum. All graduates’ artworks will be curated and displayed in a virtual gallery on the Applied Jung website.

Programme Details

Programme Details

The programme will consist of two primary elements: a lecture series and an Art of Individuation application. (Details in the respective sections.)

Lectures are presented live 5 pm London/ 12-midday New York. All lectures are recorded and made available immediately after the live broadcast. (Access to the lectures for 12-months after the end of the programme).

Students are welcome to watch the lectures and engage on the confidential Facebook forum without participating in the Art of Individuation Application. However, certification will be only be awarded to students who submit their final artwork.

START DATE /
Saturday 8 October 2022

REGISTRATION CLOSES /
Thursday 6 October 2022

PROGRAMME DURATION /
8 Weeks

PROGRAMME FEE /
$390 single payment or $150 per month for 3 months

The programme will consist of two primary elements: a lecture series and an Art of Individuation application. (Details in the respective sections.)

Lectures are presented live 5 pm London/ 12-midday New York. All lectures are recorded and made available immediately after the live broadcast. (Access to the lectures for 12-months after the end of the programme).

Students are welcome to watch the lectures and engage on the confidential Facebook forum without participating in the Art of Individuation Application. However, certification will be only be awarded to students who submit their final artwork.

START DATE /
Saturday 8 October 2022

REGISTRATION CLOSES /
Thursday 6 October 2022

PROGRAMME DURATION /
8 Weeks

PROGRAMME FEE /
$390 single payment or $150 per month for 3 months

Registration

now open

2022/10/07 10:00:00

Registration

now open

Registration now open. Email [email protected] for more information.

2022/10/07 10:00:00

SINGLE PAYMENT / $390

(Save $60)

PAYMENT PLAN

3 Monthly payments of $150 (Total of $450)

Abstracts

Abstracts

Art of Individuation / by Stephen Anthony Farah, MA

Art of Individuation: Art is the quintessential expression of the psyche and its desire for being. Through the artistic process the artist explores the questions of meaning, expression, and being. Art symbolises and through such symbolisation, represents the unconscious to reveal what was previously hidden from view. Art is a creative and generative act giving birth to something new, whilst, simultaneously, refining and reifying the psyche, continually seeking more congruent expression. Individuation arises out of a similar creative impulse. Individuation is an ongoing attempt by the subject to find ever more congruent, refined, and reified symbolic expressions of her unconscious psyche. The artist brings being into existence and into the world through her art. The individuating subject expresses her artistic impulse through her being in the world. Both are vehicles and modes of giving expression to the unconscious psyche through the creative imagination, and thereby facilitating the realisation of the Jungian “Self” or Blake’s “Regenerated Man”.

Federico García Lorca’s Theory of Duende: The Chthonic, the Bodily, and the Principle of Struggle in the Process of (Self-) Creation / by Dr Federico Bonaddio

This session will explore Lorca’s theory of duende, developed in his lecture, ‘Theory and Play of the Duende’, which he first delivered in Buenos Aires in 1933. It will consider its relation to his poetry and theatre, and particularly to the tension in his work between the imperatives of impersonal art—what José Ortega y Gasset called ‘dehumanized’ art—, in vogue in the 1920s, and his own preference for the human subject. It will consider how duende’s emphasis on the bodily and on performance related to Lorca’s longstanding interest in flamenco and how it represented a departure from the terms in which he had previously sought to define artistic processes. Above all, it will show how duende-inspired art can be understood as a mode of self-creation rooted in chthonic forces, in the bodily and in struggle; an art that Lorca considered to be especially characteristic of Spanish culture because of its intimate relationship with death.

Lorca’s Drawings: Art, Self, and the Unconscious / by Dr. Federico Bonaddio

In this session, we will consider Lorca’s drawings in the context of his evolving theories on art, paying particular attention to his lectures ‘Sketch of the New Art’ (1928) and ‘Imagination, Inspiration, Escape’ (1928-1930). We will consider the importance of his friendship with Surrealist painter Salvador Dalí and his own views on the merits and defects of Surrealist art. We will examine recurring patters across his drawings and consider how, if at all, they may give rise to symbolic interpretations. We will also consider the naivete of the drawings and the tension between their apparent spontaneity and the principles that underpinned Lorca’s conception of art and of the creative process, particularly his insistence on the necessity of form and his ambivalent attitude towards unconscious production. Above all, we will consider the extent to which his drawings may be considered revelatory of some authentic, inner self.

The Struggle of the Mutinous Human Spirit’: The Daimon Archetype in the Paintings of Mikhail Vrubel / by Cyril Coetzee

This richly slide illustrated lecture will examine Mikhail Vrubel’s feverish preoccupation with the theme of the Daimon throughout his career, giving attention to his many literary sources (Lermontov, Schopenhauer Nietzsche, Soloviev) and contextualising these ‘Daimon paintings‘ within the social milieu of the so-called ‘Silver Age’, the Symbolist period of Russian art and literature.
Particular attention will be given to the themes of Androgyny, ‘Longing’, Madness and of the ‘Dionysian impulse’ as well to a discussion of the creative tension between Pessimism and Mystical transcendence.

Individuation, performativity, and the Anthropocene / by Nobonke (Tossie van Tonder)

An auto-ethnographical journey of the self and the lesser-than-self. This seminar will be offered in a workshop format.

In and as the awakening Anthropocene we began to think of ourselves as people within a larger context. We became aware that our manner of observing and thinking which had been informed by our ever-growing historical position as central, took a “turn” of realisation that this anthropocentrism has not served us, nor our environment favourably. Moreover, it was not only dysfunctional, disorienting and pathologizing of the human beingness, the notion that we know because we know, was altogether in the wrong. This growing realisation and its effects have sanctified a new way of thinking, feeling, experiencing and moving. It opened up a cathartic vocabulary – fierce and intimate – of a humble embodiment of the decentred being, now merging freely with viruses, bacteria, pollutants, material toxicity, poverty, food insecurity, economic instability, political mayhem and overall dystopia. The sooner we embody the new materialism and their archetypes with a different presentation of: What are we for? the better we will be equipped to manage so-called futures of the interior.

Lorca, Duende, and Art / by Giannina Braschi

Imagination starts in the void where nothing works. (Giannina Braschi)

We will explore the relationship between different figures of artistic inspiration: the daemon, the duende, the angel, and the muses.  With touch points from Federico García Lorca’s classic essay Theory and Play of the Duende, we will establish the difference between the duende and the daemon, which Lorca did not see because he did not have daemon, but duende. We will discuss the concept of a Hierarchy of Inspiration—and see how these figures come through different characters and artistic genres. We will also talk about voice—and how one can recognize in the voice whether it has duende or daemon—and how these figures can help to create new shapes, forms, and structures that lead to the creation of new genres. We will see how the creation of a new movement or a new generation differs from the creation of an artistic genre, which is built in space, rather than time. “Imagination starts in that space where nothing works. What is needed is to find that void that analysis tries to fill with theories so that we do not find the gap—but it is necessary to be acquainted with that void—and to not fear that space where nothing works the way it used to—because that is the space where possibilities take place. That is the space where the daemon creates the new,” says Giannina Braschi.

Marsilio Ficino: A rich guide for our times / by Thomas Moore

Marsilio Ficino (1433-1499) was a remarkable man, not just a thinker but a practitioner, in Renaissance Florence. He was devoted to a Platonic way of life and deeply interested in various forms of magic, which he defined as making use of untapped powers in nature. He used music, color, architecture, paintings, talismans, and even aromatherapy to help people deal with their problems and to enrich society. His goal was a soul-oriented culture. His broad education and interest in occult matters require careful translating and interpreting, but they show a way for us to transform our culture and humanize it in a profound way. His work is the perfect tonic for our society’s materialism and extensive narcissism, and it contains rich ideas for teachers, leaders and psychotherapists interested in the soul of the world.

Art of Individuation workshop and discussion / by AOI core faculty

In this workshop we will reflect on the themes and ideas that emerged in seminar serries to date and discuss their impact and significance. The space will be available to discuss both the seminar and the AOI application. Students can show and discuss their projects, bring issues or sticking points to the forum, and more generally offer feedback on their experience of the programme and art making process.

Goethe on Das Dämonische in life and in art / by Prof. Paul Bishop

In this presentation we shall briefly consider the ancient conception of the daimon, before turning to Goethe’s use of the conception of the the daimonic (das Dämonische) in his autobiography, Dichtung und Wahrheit (or Poetry and Truth). Here Goethe evokes the daimonic as a decisive factor both in the composition of his drama Egmont, but also as something we could describe as an existential principle. On the basis of our discussion of this passage, we shall then turn to the motif of the daimon in Goethe’s late, great work, Urworte.Orphisch (or Primal Word. Orphic), the first stanza of which is placed precisely under the sign of – the ΔΑΙΜΩΝ.

Art of Individuation / by Stephen Anthony Farah, MA

Art of Individuation: Art is the quintessential expression of the psyche and its desire for being. Through the artistic process the artist explores the questions of meaning, expression, and being. Art symbolises and through such symbolisation, represents the unconscious to reveal what was previously hidden from view. Art is a creative and generative act giving birth to something new, whilst, simultaneously, refining and reifying the psyche, continually seeking more congruent expression. Individuation arises out of a similar creative impulse. Individuation is an ongoing attempt by the subject to find ever more congruent, refined, and reified symbolic expressions of her unconscious psyche. The artist brings being into existence and into the world through her art. The individuating subject expresses her artistic impulse through her being in the world. Both are vehicles and modes of giving expression to the unconscious psyche through the creative imagination, and thereby facilitating the realisation of the Jungian “Self” or Blake’s “Regenerated Man”.

Federico García Lorca’s Theory of Duende: The Chthonic, the Bodily, and the Principle of Struggle in the Process of (Self-) Creation / by Dr Federico Bonaddio

This session will explore Lorca’s theory of duende, developed in his lecture, ‘Theory and Play of the Duende’, which he first delivered in Buenos Aires in 1933. It will consider its relation to his poetry and theatre, and particularly to the tension in his work between the imperatives of impersonal art—what José Ortega y Gasset called ‘dehumanized’ art—, in vogue in the 1920s, and his own preference for the human subject. It will consider how duende’s emphasis on the bodily and on performance related to Lorca’s longstanding interest in flamenco and how it represented a departure from the terms in which he had previously sought to define artistic processes. Above all, it will show how duende-inspired art can be understood as a mode of self-creation rooted in chthonic forces, in the bodily and in struggle; an art that Lorca considered to be especially characteristic of Spanish culture because of its intimate relationship with death.

Lorca’s Drawings: Art, Self, and the Unconscious / by Dr. Federico Bonaddio

In this session, we will consider Lorca’s drawings in the context of his evolving theories on art, paying particular attention to his lectures ‘Sketch of the New Art’ (1928) and ‘Imagination, Inspiration, Escape’ (1928-1930). We will consider the importance of his friendship with Surrealist painter Salvador Dalí and his own views on the merits and defects of Surrealist art. We will examine recurring patters across his drawings and consider how, if at all, they may give rise to symbolic interpretations. We will also consider the naivete of the drawings and the tension between their apparent spontaneity and the principles that underpinned Lorca’s conception of art and of the creative process, particularly his insistence on the necessity of form and his ambivalent attitude towards unconscious production. Above all, we will consider the extent to which his drawings may be considered revelatory of some authentic, inner self.

The Struggle of the Mutinous Human Spirit’: The Daimon Archetype in the Paintings of Mikhail Vrubel / by Cyril Coetzee

This richly slide illustrated lecture will examine Mikhail Vrubel’s feverish preoccupation with the theme of the Daimon throughout his career, giving attention to his many literary sources (Lermontov, Schopenhauer Nietzsche, Soloviev) and contextualising these ‘Daimon paintings‘ within the social milieu of the so-called ‘Silver Age’, the Symbolist period of Russian art and literature.
Particular attention will be given to the themes of Androgyny, ‘Longing’, Madness and of the ‘Dionysian impulse’ as well to a discussion of the creative tension between Pessimism and Mystical transcendence.

Individuation, performativity, and the Anthropocene / by Nobonke (Tossie van Tonder)

An auto-ethnographical journey of the self and the lesser-than-self. This seminar will be offered in a workshop format.

In and as the awakening Anthropocene we began to think of ourselves as people within a larger context. We became aware that our manner of observing and thinking which had been informed by our ever-growing historical position as central, took a “turn” of realisation that this anthropocentrism has not served us, nor our environment favourably. Moreover, it was not only dysfunctional, disorienting and pathologizing of the human beingness, the notion that we know because we know, was altogether in the wrong. This growing realisation and its effects have sanctified a new way of thinking, feeling, experiencing and moving. It opened up a cathartic vocabulary – fierce and intimate – of a humble embodiment of the decentred being, now merging freely with viruses, bacteria, pollutants, material toxicity, poverty, food insecurity, economic instability, political mayhem and overall dystopia. The sooner we embody the new materialism and their archetypes with a different presentation of: What are we for? the better we will be equipped to manage so-called futures of the interior.

Lorca, Duende, and Art / by Giannina Braschi

Imagination starts in the void where nothing works. (Giannina Braschi)

We will explore the relationship between different figures of artistic inspiration: the daemon, the duende, the angel, and the muses.  With touch points from Federico García Lorca’s classic essay Theory and Play of the Duende, we will establish the difference between the duende and the daemon, which Lorca did not see because he did not have daemon, but duende. We will discuss the concept of a Hierarchy of Inspiration—and see how these figures come through different characters and artistic genres. We will also talk about voice—and how one can recognize in the voice whether it has duende or daemon—and how these figures can help to create new shapes, forms, and structures that lead to the creation of new genres. We will see how the creation of a new movement or a new generation differs from the creation of an artistic genre, which is built in space, rather than time. “Imagination starts in that space where nothing works. What is needed is to find that void that analysis tries to fill with theories so that we do not find the gap—but it is necessary to be acquainted with that void—and to not fear that space where nothing works the way it used to—because that is the space where possibilities take place. That is the space where the daemon creates the new,” says Giannina Braschi.

Marsilio Ficino: A rich guide for our times / by Thomas Moore

Marsilio Ficino (1433-1499) was a remarkable man, not just a thinker but a practitioner, in Renaissance Florence. He was devoted to a Platonic way of life and deeply interested in various forms of magic, which he defined as making use of untapped powers in nature. He used music, color, architecture, paintings, talismans, and even aromatherapy to help people deal with their problems and to enrich society. His goal was a soul-oriented culture. His broad education and interest in occult matters require careful translating and interpreting, but they show a way for us to transform our culture and humanize it in a profound way. His work is the perfect tonic for our society’s materialism and extensive narcissism, and it contains rich ideas for teachers, leaders and psychotherapists interested in the soul of the world.

Art of Individuation workshop and discussion / by AOI core faculty

In this workshop we will reflect on the themes and ideas that emerged in seminar serries to date and discuss their impact and significance. The space will be available to discuss both the seminar and the AOI application. Students can show and discuss their projects, bring issues or sticking points to the forum, and more generally offer feedback on their experience of the programme and art making process.

Goethe on Das Dämonische in life and in art / by Prof. Paul Bishop

In this presentation we shall briefly consider the ancient conception of the daimon, before turning to Goethe’s use of the conception of the the daimonic (das Dämonische) in his autobiography, Dichtung und Wahrheit (or Poetry and Truth). Here Goethe evokes the daimonic as a decisive factor both in the composition of his drama Egmont, but also as something we could describe as an existential principle. On the basis of our discussion of this passage, we shall then turn to the motif of the daimon in Goethe’s late, great work, Urworte.Orphisch (or Primal Word. Orphic), the first stanza of which is placed precisely under the sign of – the ΔΑΙΜΩΝ.

Faculty

Faculty

Stephen Anthony Farah, MA is the co-founder and head of learning and research at The Centre for Applied Jungian Studies South Africa. He is the current co-Chair of the International Association of Jungian Studies. Stephen holds an honours degree in analytical philosophy from the University of the Witwatersrand and a master’s degree in Jungian and Post Jungian Studies from the University of Essex. Stephen’s areas of interest include psychoanalysis, film, the philosophy of language, consciousness, individuation, and futurism. His paper ‘True detective and Jung’s four steps of transformation’ was published in The Routledge International Handbook of Jungian Film Studies in 2018. He is co-editor (along with Marybeth Carter) of ‘The Spectre of the Other in Jungian Psychoanalysis: Political, Psychological and Sociological Perspectives’, publication by Routledge, 2022.

Dr Federico Bonaddio is Reader in Modern Spanish Studies at King’s College London. He lectures principally on twentieth-century Spanish literature as well as on Spanish cinema. He has written extensively on the work of Federico García Lorca, particularly on his poetry. He has concerned himself above all with the self-conscious character of Lorca’s work and with how its themes reflect the poet’s artistic priorities and creative concerns. He is the editor of A Companion to Federico Lorca (2007) and the author of Federico García Lorca: The Poetics of Self-Consciousness (2010) and of Federico García Lorca: The Poetry in All Things (2022), all published by Tamesis.

Cyril Coetzee is a portrait artist and has painted both informal and commissioned portraits throughout his career, including the portrait of Nelson Mandela, which was used for the international stamp commemorating Mandela’s 90th birthday. He has served as a Fine Art lecturer at Port Elizabeth Technikon, as an Art History lecturer at University of the Witwatersrand and has been invited to give various lectures on Art History and on his own work in South Africa, England, Switzerland, the United States and Canada. His works are included in various public and private collections worldwide, including the Royal Ontario Museum, Johannesburg Art Gallery, the Standard Bank in London and the School of Oriental and African Studies in London. In 1996 he was commissioned by the University of the Witwatersrand to paint a 28 square meter canvas for the William Cullen Library, an internationally renowned archive, for the 75th celebrations of the University, which was unveiled by Judge Goldstone in 1999. Awards won include the: Helgaard Steyn Award (2003) and the Vita Art Award (1993). Coetzee has exhibited internationally and was invited to hold solo retrospective exhibitions at the University of South Africa Gallery, Pretoria, and the Getrude Posel Gallery at the University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg in 1993.

Tossie van Tonder, also known as Nobonke.   She was given this name by the Mjoli clan in the Eastern Cape. In her book ‘My African Heart’ she writes about her journey with a struggle veteran, freedom fighter and political prisoner. Here she also gives her yet unborn child a voice of political-spiritual significance that marked her own psycho-analysis of what it means to be a White mother in South Africa. Her other name is derived from the African mythological figure, Tokoloshe. Her ancestors from Danish/German/Dutch descent arrived in the Cape in 1700. She identifies as Afrikaner. The bodymind has marked the beginnings of her professional life a dancer-psychologist in a Masters’ thesis written in 1978 on the effects of body movement on mental health conditions. After studying dance-therapy in New York till 1980 she returned to private practice in South Africa which she still does. Nobonke spans dance activities from choreography for dance companies to teaching at various schools and university departments. These are always deeper research and more experimental forays into the art and human science of how the moving body acts as mentality. Her further investigations into environmental realities such as climate change have rolled out a series of professional transdisciplinary engagements with students in psychology, philosophy, performance art and environmental studies. Nobonke marks her own developmental stages with teaching and artistic work. Currently she reflects deeply upon the purpose of being an elder in a community within the context of environmental volatility.

Dr Giannina Braschi. The United States Library of Congress calls Giannina Braschi’s writing “cutting-edge, influential, and even revolutionary.” Her best known books include Empire of Dreams, Yo-Yo Boing!, and United States of Banana. She writes on far-ranging subjects from immigration, economy, and colonialism to love, liberty, and creativity. The North American Academy of the Spanish Language honored Braschi in 2022 for her lifetime achievements in American literature written in Spanish, Spanglish, and English. She holds a Ph.D. in Hispanic Literatures from the State University of New York and has published on Cervantes, Garcilaso, Machado, Becquer, and Lorca. She has won awards and fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Ford Foundation, the Danforth Scholarship, the New York Foundation for the Arts, Instituto de Cultura Puertorriqueña, Rutgers University, PEN America, and Cambio16 News in Madrid. Her life’s work is the subject of a scholarly anthology of essays, entitled Poets, Philosophers, Lovers: On the Writings of Giannina Braschi, edited by Frederick Luis Aldama and Tess O’Dwyer (Pittsburgh, 2020). She was born in San Juan, Puerto Rico and is based in New York.

Thomas Moore has a Ph.D. in Religious Studies from Syracuse University and is best known for his bestselling book Care of the Soul. He has published thirty books, the most recent Soul Therapy and soon to be published The Eloquence of Silence: Surprising Lessons from Stories about Emptiness. He was a close friend of James Hillman, with whom he worked closely, editing an anthology of Hillman’s writings, A Blue Fire. His early book, The Planets Within, is a depth psychological study of Marsilio Ficino. He has taught at Jung societies in many places including Rome, London, Moscow, Romania, Brazil, , Chicago, New York, and Houston. He spent thirteen years as a Catholic monk and has been a psychotherapist for forty years. Thomas has degrees in music and plays Bach and Debussy every day.

Professor Paul Bishop is William Jacks Chair of Modern Languages at the University of Glasgow, UK. After studying at Oxford and (for a year) at Harvard, Paul has lived and worked in the great Scottish city of Glasgow for nearly three decades. He is interested in all aspects of German culture and thought, in tracing the progression of ideas through time, and in uncovering links between German culture and the concepts of psychoanalysis, with particular emphasis on analytical psychology. His doctoral dissertation, subsequently published with de Gruyter as The Dionysian Self, examined Jung’s reception of the thought of Friedrich Nietzsche. Although he is currently researching the philosophy of Ludwig Klages, the publication of the Red Book and subsequently the Black Books means he keeps returning to Jung’s remarkably rich and fertile thought. He is the author of Reading Goethe At Midlife: Ancient Wisdom, German Classicism, and Jung (2011; republished in 2020 by Chiron); Carl Jung [Critical Lives series] (Reaktion 2014); and other studies on aspects of Jung’s thought in an intellectual-historical perspective (published by Routledge). His most recent publication is Nietzsche’s The Anti-Christ: A Critical Introduction and Guide (Edinburgh University Press 2022).

Stephen Anthony Farah, MA is the co-founder and head of learning and research at The Centre for Applied Jungian Studies South Africa. He is the current co-Chair of the International Association of Jungian Studies. Stephen holds an honours degree in analytical philosophy from the University of the Witwatersrand and a master’s degree in Jungian and Post Jungian Studies from the University of Essex. Stephen’s areas of interest include psychoanalysis, film, the philosophy of language, consciousness, individuation, and futurism. His paper ‘True detective and Jung’s four steps of transformation’ was published in The Routledge International Handbook of Jungian Film Studies in 2018. He is co-editor (along with Marybeth Carter) of ‘The Spectre of the Other in Jungian Psychoanalysis: Political, Psychological and Sociological Perspectives’, publication by Routledge, 2022.

Dr Federico Bonaddio is Reader in Modern Spanish Studies at King’s College London. He lectures principally on twentieth-century Spanish literature as well as on Spanish cinema. He has written extensively on the work of Federico García Lorca, particularly on his poetry. He has concerned himself above all with the self-conscious character of Lorca’s work and with how its themes reflect the poet’s artistic priorities and creative concerns. He is the editor of A Companion to Federico Lorca (2007) and the author of Federico García Lorca: The Poetics of Self-Consciousness (2010) and of Federico García Lorca: The Poetry in All Things (2022), all published by Tamesis.

Cyril Coetzee is a portrait artist and has painted both informal and commissioned portraits throughout his career, including the portrait of Nelson Mandela, which was used for the international stamp commemorating Mandela’s 90th birthday. He has served as a Fine Art lecturer at Port Elizabeth Technikon, as an Art History lecturer at University of the Witwatersrand and has been invited to give various lectures on Art History and on his own work in South Africa, England, Switzerland, the United States and Canada. His works are included in various public and private collections worldwide, including the Royal Ontario Museum, Johannesburg Art Gallery, the Standard Bank in London and the School of Oriental and African Studies in London. In 1996 he was commissioned by the University of the Witwatersrand to paint a 28 square meter canvas for the William Cullen Library, an internationally renowned archive, for the 75th celebrations of the University, which was unveiled by Judge Goldstone in 1999. Awards won include the: Helgaard Steyn Award (2003) and the Vita Art Award (1993). Coetzee has exhibited internationally and was invited to hold solo retrospective exhibitions at the University of South Africa Gallery, Pretoria, and the Getrude Posel Gallery at the University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg in 1993.

Tossie van Tonder, also known as Nobonke.   She was given this name by the Mjoli clan in the Eastern Cape. In her book ‘My African Heart’ she writes about her journey with a struggle veteran, freedom fighter and political prisoner. Here she also gives her yet unborn child a voice of political-spiritual significance that marked her own psycho-analysis of what it means to be a White mother in South Africa. Her other name is derived from the African mythological figure, Tokoloshe. Her ancestors from Danish/German/Dutch descent arrived in the Cape in 1700. She identifies as Afrikaner. The bodymind has marked the beginnings of her professional life a dancer-psychologist in a Masters’ thesis written in 1978 on the effects of body movement on mental health conditions. After studying dance-therapy in New York till 1980 she returned to private practice in South Africa which she still does. Nobonke spans dance activities from choreography for dance companies to teaching at various schools and university departments. These are always deeper research and more experimental forays into the art and human science of how the moving body acts as mentality. Her further investigations into environmental realities such as climate change have rolled out a series of professional transdisciplinary engagements with students in psychology, philosophy, performance art and environmental studies. Nobonke marks her own developmental stages with teaching and artistic work. Currently she reflects deeply upon the purpose of being an elder in a community within the context of environmental volatility.

Dr Giannina Braschi. The United States Library of Congress calls Giannina Braschi’s writing “cutting-edge, influential, and even revolutionary.” Her best known books include Empire of Dreams, Yo-Yo Boing!, and United States of Banana. She writes on far-ranging subjects from immigration, economy, and colonialism to love, liberty, and creativity. The North American Academy of the Spanish Language honored Braschi in 2022 for her lifetime achievements in American literature written in Spanish, Spanglish, and English. She holds a Ph.D. in Hispanic Literatures from the State University of New York and has published on Cervantes, Garcilaso, Machado, Becquer, and Lorca. She has won awards and fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Ford Foundation, the Danforth Scholarship, the New York Foundation for the Arts, Instituto de Cultura Puertorriqueña, Rutgers University, PEN America, and Cambio16 News in Madrid. Her life’s work is the subject of a scholarly anthology of essays, entitled Poets, Philosophers, Lovers: On the Writings of Giannina Braschi, edited by Frederick Luis Aldama and Tess O’Dwyer (Pittsburgh, 2020). She was born in San Juan, Puerto Rico and is based in New York.

Thomas Moore has a Ph.D. in Religious Studies from Syracuse University and is best known for his bestselling book Care of the Soul. He has published thirty books, the most recent Soul Therapy and soon to be published The Eloquence of Silence: Surprising Lessons from Stories about Emptiness. He was a close friend of James Hillman, with whom he worked closely, editing an anthology of Hillman’s writings, A Blue Fire. His early book, The Planets Within, is a depth psychological study of Marsilio Ficino. He has taught at Jung societies in many places including Rome, London, Moscow, Romania, Brazil, , Chicago, New York, and Houston. He spent thirteen years as a Catholic monk and has been a psychotherapist for forty years. Thomas has degrees in music and plays Bach and Debussy every day.

Professor Paul Bishop is William Jacks Chair of Modern Languages at the University of Glasgow, UK. After studying at Oxford and (for a year) at Harvard, Paul has lived and worked in the great Scottish city of Glasgow for nearly three decades. He is interested in all aspects of German culture and thought, in tracing the progression of ideas through time, and in uncovering links between German culture and the concepts of psychoanalysis, with particular emphasis on analytical psychology. His doctoral dissertation, subsequently published with de Gruyter as The Dionysian Self, examined Jung’s reception of the thought of Friedrich Nietzsche. Although he is currently researching the philosophy of Ludwig Klages, the publication of the Red Book and subsequently the Black Books means he keeps returning to Jung’s remarkably rich and fertile thought. He is the author of Reading Goethe At Midlife: Ancient Wisdom, German Classicism, and Jung (2011; republished in 2020 by Chiron); Carl Jung [Critical Lives series] (Reaktion 2014); and other studies on aspects of Jung’s thought in an intellectual-historical perspective (published by Routledge). His most recent publication is Nietzsche’s The Anti-Christ: A Critical Introduction and Guide (Edinburgh University Press 2022).

Artwork by Mikhail Vrubel